THE HELE MAI, AI COOKBOOK Flavors of Upcountry Maui, History and Hospitality

This digital document is an article from Wilson Bulletin, published by Wilson Ornithological Society on December 1, 2000. The length of the article is 5353 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF THE MAUI PARROTBILL.
Author: John C. Simon
Publication: Wilson Bulletin (Refereed)
Date: December 1, 2000
Publisher: Wilson Ornithological Society
Volume: 112 Issue: 4 Page: 482

Distributed by Thomson Gale

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West Maui: A Natural History Guide

West Maui: A Natural History Guide

Long ago, when the world was new and little Maui was born, the great god Tama carried him away to the underworld to learn magic. When Maui came back to earth, his brothers made fun of him and wouldn’t take him out fishing. They stole away in their boat, laughing at him and thinking he was still asleep — but Maui outwitted his brothers, caught the biggest fish in the ocean, and in the process created something amazing!

This charming tale of Maui of the Thousand Tricks is accompanied by the brilliant, sun-splashed artwork of illustrator Frane Lessac.

Price: $15.95

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Maui: Webster’s Timeline History, 1505 – 2007

Maui: Webster's Timeline History, 1505 - 2007Webster’s bibliographic and event-based timelines are comprehensive in scope, covering virtually all topics, geographic locations and people. They do so from a linguistic point of view, and in the case of this book, the focus is on “Maui,” including when used in literature (e.g. all authors that might have Maui in their name). As such, this book represents the largest compilation of timeline events associated with Maui when it is used in proper noun form. Webster’s timelines cover bibliographic citations, patented inventions, as well as non-conventional and alternative meanings which capture ambiguities in usage. These furthermore cover all parts of speech (possessive, institutional usage, geographic usage) and contexts, including pop culture, the arts, social sciences (linguistics, history, geography, economics, sociology, political science), business, computer science, literature, law, medicine, psychology, mathematics, chemistry, physics, biology and other physical sciences. This “data dump” results in a comprehensive set of entries for a bibliographic and/or event-based timeline on the proper name Maui, since editorial decisions to include or exclude events is purely a linguistic process. The resulting entries are used under license or with permission, used under “fair use” conditions, used in agreement with the original authors, or are in the public domain.

Price: $28.95

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Supplement to A Brief History and Commentary on the Pineapple Industry of Maui, Hawaii.

This digital document is an article from Wilson Bulletin, published by Wilson Ornithological Society on December 1, 2000. The length of the article is 5353 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF THE MAUI PARROTBILL.
Author: John C. Simon
Publication: Wilson Bulletin (Refereed)
Date: December 1, 2000
Publisher: Wilson Ornithological Society
Volume: 112 Issue: 4 Page: 482

Distributed by Thomson Gale

Price:

Click here to buy from Amazon

Mowee: A History of Maui the Magic Isle

Maui, the Magic Isle. Now home to more than 100,000 residents, it was named for a mythical demi-god believed to have pulled all the islands from the sea with a magical fishhook. In Mowee, the Island’s fascinating history is revealed, beginning with the politics of an ancient Hawaiian chiefdom and ending with Maui’s present development as a growing population of U.S. mainland transplants, and descendants of plantation-era immigrants from around the world, debate the future of the Magic Isle.

Maui was once the center of political and commercial life during the first decades of the Hawaiian Kingdom. With the arrival of foreigners at the end of the 18th century, the island called “Mowee” by early sailors began to fade in importance as an increasingly westernized culture turned from Lahaina to the deep-water port of Honolulu.

At the dawn of the 20th century, the rapid growth of the sugar and pineapple industries brought immigrants from as far away as the Philippines, China, Japan, and Portugal, changing the face of Maui’s community forever. Yet Maui managed to retain the rural qualities of island living that old-time residents still wistfully recall.

With the turn from agriculture to tourism, Maui continues to prosper economically. In the half-century since statehood, the island has blossomed into an international visitor destination. And as new technology industries move in, Maui residents keep a watchful eye, making sure that their proud motto, “Maui no ka oi (Maui is the best)” remains true throughout the years.

Price: $9.95

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